Farm Life Opposites

Jul 31, 2014 by

Last week, Illinois Farm Families’ blog published a post I wrote.  I’m posting it here for those of you who missed it.

 

Recently, this blog shared a post about being under 30 and over $1 million in debt.  That really struck a chord with me (even though I’m 31).

It served as a good reminder that, in many ways, going from a “normal” life to a farm wife requires a complete shift in thinking. I often find that for all the “truths” that apply to suburban life, the exact opposite is true for farm families.

Non-farm jobs get paid on a regular basis, whether it’s weekly, bi-weekly or monthly. Farmers get paid sporadically throughout the year, whenever they sell grain or a contracted crop is harvested. Some years that amounts to three payments in a 12-month period, therefore you have to be REALLY on top of your finances.

Non-farmers are taught that loans are bad and to be avoided, if at all possible. Farmers not only need loans, we RELY on loans. We may only get paid three times a year, but our bills are due every month just like everyone else. In order for them to be paid on time, we get an operating loan. An operating loan can range from tens of thousands to millions of dollars, depending on the size of the farmer’s operation. The operating loan is basically a one-year line of credit to fill in during the times we haven’t been paid for a few months. The loan is always paid back at the end of the year. Sure, paying interest irritates farmers just as it would any other person but, for farmers, it’s simply part of life.

The same goes for credit cards. Most people are taught not to use credit cards for things they cannot afford. Farmers use credit cards for things they really can afford but, due to the timing of our income being varied, may not have the cash for this very second. For example, a new combine costs around $200,000. Not too many people have that kind of cash on hand. And that’s just ONE of the pieces of machinery we require. Farming has a lot of overhead.

One last difference also has to do with our proximity (or lack thereof) to the rest of society. Because we live 35 miles from the nearest city, when we do drive there to shop, get groceries, run errands, etc. we tend to buy more, spend more and do more at one time. This leads to the difference in fuel efficiency as a priority. Most people are taught that they should buy the most fuel-efficient vehicles they can. Farmers still care about fuel efficiency but oftentimes the vehicles with better gas mileage are either too small or not made for the rough terrain. The average MPG of our two main vehicles is 15 MPG. My husband cannot haul grain in a Prius and I can’t fit two kids, a golden retriever and enough groceries to survive the apocalypse into a Camry. Not to mention, it’s pretty tough to take lunch out to the field without four-wheel drive.

One thing we have in common with non-farmers is that the majority of people want to live reasonably close to where we work. We don’t just live reasonably close; we live where we work. Literally. But we aren’t so different. Non-farmers might be checking their work email at 11 pm and farmers might be out checking their irrigators.

All in all, we aren’t so different; like everything else in life, it’s just a matter of perspective.

Related Posts

Share This

1 Comment

  1. Connie Green

    Great piece to read Lauren. Going from a farming girl to a non-farming wife I can relate and understand the differences and am so thankful there are young people today that still want to be farmers. The rest of the world couldn’t survive without farmers.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: